Real Estate Northern Territory Are you ReDIY?

We are ReDIY and passionate about Real Estate NT. Buy | Sell | Rent | Invest

Real Estate Northern Territory

ReDIY is helping DIY Sellers and Landlords throughout the Northern Territory to Sell and Rent their properties privately. ReDIY advertises Private Sales and Private Rentals, on Realestate.com.au, Domain.com.au and 8 other dedicated Real Estate sites for a one off low fee until sold or leased. We are here to give you the tools to Do It Yourself. We do not charge any extras, no commission, no let fee, no management fee, just the one low cost, to advertise, your property.

Our innovative web site, is so easy to use. When signing up, you create your own username and password which gives you your very own dashboard on our site. Enter your property details, enter the advertising text, make payment (Visit www.rediy.com.au for the advertising costs) and select "Go Live". Your advertisement is then uploaded, almost instantly, to all the sites, including realestate.com and domain.com. Through your dashboard, you can make as many changes and updates as you require. All enquiries land in your dashboard, as well as by email. Come on NT, buy, sell, rent with ReDIY.

History of Northern Territory


The Northern Territory (abbreviated as NT) is a federal Australian territory in the central and central northern regions of Australia. It shares borders with Western Australia to the west, South Australia to the south and Queensland to the east. To the north, the territory is bordered by the Timor Sea, the Arafura Sea and the Gulf of Carpentaria. Despite its large area - over 1,349,129 square kilometres - making it the third largest Australian federal division - it is sparsely populated. The Northern Territory's population of 244,000 (2016) makes it the least populous of Australia's eight major states and territories, having fewer than half as many people as Tasmania.

With the coming of the British, there were four early attempts to settle the harsh environment of the northern coast, of which three failed in starvation and despair. The Northern Territory was part of colonial New South Wales from 1825 to 1863, except for a brief time from February to December 1846, when it was part of the short-lived colony of North Australia. It was part of South Australia from 1863 to 1911. Under the administration of colonial South Australia, the overland telegraph was constructed between 1870 and 1872.

On 1 January 1911, a decade after federation, the Northern Territory was separated from South Australia and transferred to Commonwealth control. Letters Patent annexing the Northern Territory to South Australia, 1863. In late 1912 there was growing sentiment that the name "Northern Territory" was unsatisfactory. The names "Kingsland" (after King George V and to correspond with Queensland), "Centralia" and "Territoria" were proposed with Kingsland becoming the preferred choice in 1913. However, the name change never went ahead.

There are many very small settlements scattered across the territory, but the larger population centres are located on the single paved road that links Darwin to southern Australia, the Stuart Highway, known to locals simply as "the track".

The Northern Territory is also home to two spectacular natural rock formations, Uluru (Ayers Rock) and Kata Tjuta (The Olgas), which are sacred to the local Aboriginal peoples and which have become major tourist attractions.

In the northern part of the Territory lies Kakadu National Park, which features breathtaking wetlands and native wildlife. To the north of that lies the Arafura Sea, and to the east lies Arnhem Land, whose regional centre is Maningrida on the Liverpool River delta. There is an extensive series of river systems in the Northern Territory. These rivers include: the Alligator Rivers, Daly River, Finke River, McArthur River, Roper River, Todd River and Victoria River.

The Northern Territory has two distinctive climate zones.
The northern end, including Darwin, has a tropical climate with high humidity and two seasons, the wet (October to April) and dry season (May to September). During the dry season nearly every day is warm and sunny, and afternoon humidity averages around 30%. There is very little rainfall between May and September. In the coolest months of June and July, the daily minimum temperature may dip as low as 14 °C but very rarely lower, and frost has never been recorded. The wet season is associated with tropical cyclones and monsoon rains.

Capital City Household Price Performance


Capital City Household Price Performance

Capital City Price Forecast Recent Years


Capital City Price Forecast Recent Years

Why invest and live in Northern Territory


A number of Darwin real estate agents are optimistic about the city’s property market, predicting that housing values have hit the bottom of their cycle. But other professionals in the industry remain uncertain whether prices have hit an all-time low, with 2018 unfolding to be an even better year for buyers to find a bargain. With Darwin’s median sale price for a house $495,000 and a unit, $405,000, the market remains favourable for those looking to buy property, but some are predicting that 2018 could be a great year for sellers.

According to Realestate.com, Darwin joins Townsville and Perth as a city to watch. While prices are still going backwards, demand is slowly picking up. The city is small, but it is the northern suburbs – close to Charles Darwin University – that continue to see the highest levels of demand.

The most popular suburb right now is Jingili. Once Palmerston’s new hospital’s infrastructure is in place, those who invested out there will see the benefit. Palmerston also has a brand-new shopping centre opening up this year.

The Real Estate Institute of Northern Territory (REINT) says median house price in Alice Springs fell again, by nearly 10 per cent to $423,500, in the September quarter. The median unit price in Alice Springs also took a tumble, down by 23 per cent to $260,500.

Darwin - The capital of The Northern Territory.
Darwin is the capital city of the Northern Territory of Australia. Situated on the Timor Sea, Darwin is the largest city in the sparsely populated Northern Territory, with a population of 145,916. It is the smallest and most northerly of the Australian capital cities, and acts as the Top End's regional centre.

Adam Giles

Adam Giles
Chief Minister of
Northern Territory

katherine gorge sunset
desert park

Areas and Towns of Northern Territory


Things to do in Northern Territory


Uluru - Ayres Rock

Uluru - Ayres Rock

Kakadu National Park

Kakadu National Park

Territory Wildlife Park

Territory Wildlife Park

SkyCity Casino

SkyCity Casino

WWII Oil Storage Tunnels

WWII Oil Storage Tunnels

Alice Springs Desert Park

Alice Springs Desert Park

House Styles in Northern Territory


Covering almost 45 hectares south-west of Darwin Airport, RAAF Base Darwin was pivotal in the build up of Defence Forces in the period to the start of World War II. The base contains one of the oldest surviving groups of houses in Darwin, as well as individual structures and groups of buildings that stand as fine examples of military architecture and the adaptation of buildings to suit tropical climates. The precinct has additional significance for the local community as it survived the onslaught of Cyclone Tracey in 1974.

A significant landmark at RAAF Base Darwin, Water Tower 129 attracts considerable interest for its dual water storage and air traffic control functions.

Throughout its history, the tower has been associated with the military build-up in Darwin prior to the outbreak of fighting in the Pacific during World War II and the construction of improved town water supplies.

RAAF Base commanding officer's residence (Banksian House)
The former residence of numerous senior RAAF officers, Banksian House with its cross ventilation, elevated floor and wide eaves is an excellent example of government architect B.C.G. Burnett's design adapted for the tropical climate.

Located on Darwin's RAAF Base and historically significant for its association with the development of military installations in Darwin, the building is part of one of the oldest surviving groups of housing in Darwin.

When you think of old Darwin, the sort of architecture that springs to mind is an elevated house with walls of louvres, fans spinning in the humid air, surrounded by a thicket of greenery. Houses designed by architect Beni Burnett in the 1930s became the inspiration for housing in the Top End for at least another two decades, partly because there wasn't really an alternative at the time. And even in the 1950s, ceiling fans were one of the only mechanical means of cooling.

There's a wide-held belief that the change in the engineering code in the aftermath of Cyclone Tracy in 1974 signalled the end of lightweight tropical housing. The new building code made it mandatory for parts of all houses in Darwin to be cyclone-proof. In the 1970s, when there was an increasingly rapid influx of people and multinational businesses from the southern cities, it was evident that "new, anywhere-Australia housing forms" were dominating Darwin, and air-conditioning was becoming popular and affordable.

tropical living holiday apartments aboriginal bush shelter

We are ReDIY your complete DIY Property Solution. Our Real Estate Wbesite is dedicated to helping only private landlords and property sellers achieve their Real Estate Goals. Through our innovative website you can list your property instantly on all the Major Real Estate websites like RealEstate.com.au and Domain.com.au. Buyers and tenants can enquire through our live chat function 24/7 so you will never miss an important enquiry. We have many other tools to make your DIY journey a smooth one so sign up for Free and start exploring now.